Glyconutrients And Sleep Deprivation – 8 Tips To Improve Your Sleep

By Spencer Hunt

Are You Tired of Waking Up On The Wrong Side Of Bed?

Do you wake up and still feel drowsy? If you are dealing with sleep deprivation, you are not alone. Almost 1/4 of America’s adults, or 47 million adults, have some type of sleep deprivation. This condition can affect your emotional state, energy level, memory and mental abilities. As you may have noticed, this can eventually lead to depression, stress and irritability. There are other health implications that can afflict the body as a result of sleep deprivation. As the body is deprived of sleep, its ability to metabolize glucose declines, which leads to

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5 New Sleep Commands To Trick Your Body Into Falling Asleep While You Keep Your Mind Awake

Here in Lucidology 101 part 4 we’ll cover 5 new sleep commands that you can use to quickly trick the body into falling asleep so you can end insomnia and have frequent lucid dreams and O.B.E.s.

The Discovery Of The Roll Over Signal And Sleep Paralysis Connection

A while back I had been up all night working on something. Around noon I was very tired and decided to lay down for a few moments. As I lay there I began to feel a very uncomfortable urge to roll over. For no real reason I decided to ignore it and just lay there. To my extreme surprise I felt the paralysis wave roll over me and put me in full sleep paralysis.

The paralysis was completely unexpected. I had always thought it was something you had to be very deeply relaxed to achieve. Instead I was actually fairly tense and my mind was not at all in any kind of meditative state.

I’d accidentally found something that I had never seen in any books on lucid dreaming. The roll over signal itself was all you need to enter paralysis. I spent the next several months

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Sleep Apnea – Dealing With This Common Sleep Disorder

By George Royal

One of the most well-known sleep disorders, sleep apnea is a fairly common condition. Marked by interruptions in breathing during sleep, sleep apnea causes the person suffering from this condition to wake up, or partially wake, several times during the night. Because of the frequency of these interruptions in breathing, a person with sleep apnea will have trouble getting a restful night’s sleep, causing them to feel the effects of sleep deprivation during their waking hours.

Two types of sleep apnea have been diagnosed: obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and central sleep apnea. OSA is caused by the soft palate becoming so relaxed that it actually blocks off the breathing passageway, while central sleep apnea is caused by the brain relaxing to the point that it does not remind the body to breathe. While both types can cause interruptions to breathing on their own, most people with sleep apnea actually have mixed apnea, which is a combination of both forms.

Sleep apnea is sometimes difficult to diagnose, simply because it only strikes while the person is asleep and won’t notice that it is happening. Because most people with sleep apnea awake only partially – not fully – so they do not actually notice that they have had their sleep cycle interrupted. Thus, if someone wants to determine if they have sleep apnea,

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Sleep: An interesting story

When you’re in a hurry to do your work, go to school, look after family, do you reduce your sleep time?  You might think that sleep is merely a “down time” when the brain shuts off and the body rests. It is not so. Sleep is essential for a person’s health and wellbeing, according to the National Sleep Foundation (NSF).

Sleep is as important as food and air. It is a necessary function required to support all human life, growth, development and brain function. Sleep keeps your mind alert and calm. It helps you in optimal daily functioning.

If you wake up tired after sleeping for eight hours or longer, more sleep is not what you need. 

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Heads Up! The Way You Are Sleeping May Be Killing You!

Every one of us has a mysterious double life.

For about two thirds of the time we are conscious beings, thinking about the world within and without, and negotiating our ways through the obstacles of life. For the other one third of the time we are nearly lifeless lumps of flesh, unconscious to everything but our own fantasies, as we lie flat in bed asleep. We all know that sleep is important for health. But for an activity that consumes about 8 hours of everyday of life, surprisingly little is thought about the act of sleeping, or the way our culture teaches us to sleep. Sleep behavior, like all human activities, is defined by our culture.

Sometimes, the practices taught by our culture can impact on the way our bodies function. As medical anthropologists, we research ways our cultural practices may be affecting our health. And we have found that the way we have been trained to sleep may be one of the most important causes of various diseases plaguing our society.

Of course, when you consider the culture of sleeping, it includes such isues as the length of time to sleep, and time of day for sleep. Do you take frequent naps or do you sleep 8 hours straight? Do you sleep at night or during the day?

Other issues concern sleepwear. Do you sleep nude, or with pajamas or lingerie? Do you sleep in your underwear? Should the sheets be natural fabrics, such as cotton or silk, or is polyester okay? What about the detergent and fabric softeners used in the sheets, pillow case, and pj’s?

Should you eat before you sleep? What is the impact of watching television before sleep? Should you take sleeping pills to help you sleep?

These are some of the culturally defined issues that help determine how we sleep, all of which may have some potential impact on health. However, there is one cultural issue that tops the list of importance, and which may greatly determine your health status.

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